perching (2020-2021)

perching 2021

Originally conceived as a gallery installation pre-Covid for Wimbledon Space (public gallery at Wimbledon College of Arts), perching 2021 offers 5 days of Instagram posts revisiting past and current projects by dance artists Natalie Garrett Brown and Amy Voris and photographer Christian Kipp. Created with a range of artists, dancing in public, outdoor and gallery spaces are central to these collaborations. perching 2021 invites us to playfully reflect on how we might re-inhabit public spaces and places together post the pandemic.

enter inhabit

Using durational movement improvisation, photography and writing enter & inhabit explores presence in sites of flow and transition. Casting accidental audience / invited witnesses as co-creators the project offers traces of the artists’ embodied experience as an invitation into public spaces and landscapes.

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credits for enter inhabit:
Movement and Performance - Natalie Garrett Brown & Amy Voris
Photography - Christian Kipp

L219

L219 is an installation of light, film, sound, objects and movement encompassing 9 artists experimenting with the adjacent-spillover of their materially-oriented making processes. This durational and improvised work treads a boundary between light and dark, inside and outside, the reified and the everyday.

credits for L219:
Lighting Design - Cath Cullinane
Movement and Performance - Natalie Garrett Brown & Amy Voris
Photography - Christian Kipp
Jewellery Maker - Zoe Robertson
Sound - Darren Pickles & Nicholas Peters (2013) / James Buchanan (2012)
Film - Stephen Snell & Steven Chamberlain
performances:
Lanchester Gallery, Coventry 2012
Stranger Than Fiction at Siobhan Davies Studios, London 2012
created with support from:
Lanchester Gallery, Coventry
Stranger Than Fiction, London
publication:
Cullinane, Garrett Brown, Kipp and Voris (2015), ‘At dusk, the collaborative spills and cycles of L219′ in Attending to Movement: Somatic Perspectives on Living in this World. Edited by Alexander, Garret Brown and Whatley. Devon: Triarchy Press, pp. 135-144

flockOmania

flockOmania features wearable sculptures made by jewellry designer Zoe Robertson which have been generated in collaboration with dance artists Natalie Garrett Brown and Amy Voris. This collection of work responds to the tactility and sensuality of industrial materials which are not typically associated with the commercial jewellery discipline. The objects have been meticulously hand crafted using traditional fabrication techniques in combination with industrial processes and new technology.

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credits for flockOmania:
Jewellery Maker - Zoe Robertson
Movement - Natalie Garrett Brown & Amy Voris
Lighting Design - Cath Cullinane
Photography - Christian Kipp
Sound - Darren Pickles & Nicholas Peters / Tom Tebby
Film - Stephen Snell & Steven Chamberlain
performances:
The CASS Edition, London January 2017
Music Tech Fest, Berlin May 2016
Lanchester Gallery, Coventry February 2015

skirting

skirting is an improvised and durational practice for the peripheral spaces and transitional times of an event. Movement material and photography are resourced from the felt-sense of the body, drawing on sensorial and imaginal input of the site as it is experienced. With this practice, we seek to offer a presence that both belongs to and stands separate from the space it inhabits.

credits for skirting:
Movement and Performance - Natalie Garrett Brown and Amy Voris
Photography - Christian Kipp
performances:
Performing Process, Sharing Practice Symposium, Coventry University 2014
International Federation of Theatre Research World Congress, University of Warwick 2014
created with support from:
University of Chichester

perch

perch is a solo dance about temporary states and locations and the movement in-between these things. It is about the process of homing while feeling haunted by the past. First and foremost however perch is a practice, performed regularly by one person, for a place. The movement score shifts between states of groundedness and flight and hovers over the transitions which transform these states. With each practice the work bears witness to its immediate conditions and, in so doing, with each practice the work subtly adapts and evolves. In this way, the ‘form’ of the work offers a means of simultaneously practising holding on to and letting go of what is known about the work and the world that it moves through.

perch was originally developed in a room in a former cotton spinning mill in Manchester and was eventually performed at dusk to small audiences.

credits for perch:
Choreography and Performance - Amy Voris
Photography and Video - Christian Kipp
performances:
AWOL studios September 2018 / April 2019
created with support from:
University of Chichester